Karachi jumps over three position on The Economist’s Safe Cities Index

In 2019, the Economist's Safe Cities Index, Karachi listed low—57th out of 60. This classification, however, improves on the last classification in 2017.

Which cities rank above the Karachi?

The international publication Intelligence Unit keeps a constantly revised report on the strengths and faults of major cities worldwide. The list included 60 main cities such as Karachi, New Delhi, Mumbai, Dhaka, New York City, Tokyo, Amsterdam, etc.

The general ranking of Karachi was 57 out of 60, and scored 43.5. It was 71.1 on average. It listed below Mumbai (45), Dhaka (56) and New Delhi (52).

What is the general classification of index?

The general classification was four on average — personal security, digital security, health security, and infrastructure security.

Karachi was 58, with a rating of 45.9 in personal security. The rating was 77 in average. Singapore was the highest on the list and the Lagos on lowest. Karachi listed 52 in digital security and 50 on health security. But it was 55, two positions above New Delhi in infrastructure security.

 


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Digital security seems less improved

This is a simplification of its classification as a whole, which takes consideration of personal security (like the probability that an assault will take place), infrastructure (walking and lighting spaces) and hygiene (no air pollution). With regard to digital safety, "the moment looks less secure if contactless debit cards from our pedestrian's bag are paid by anyone walking in the other path by a hidden RFC reader."

However, some dangers are still hovering on Karachi

In another classification in the same study, Karachi was partly prepared for catastrophe danger. The risk of a disaster is included and accounted for active national plans for, but not in planning or layout in its urban plan or policy.

"Nevertheless, in emerging mega-cities such as Karachi, Dhaka and Lagos, there seems to be an increasing danger of crises.


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